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Showing posts with label writing. Show all posts
Showing posts with label writing. Show all posts

Saturday, August 8, 2020

Patience and Perseverance

Thousands of aspiring screenwriters dream of writing the next hot script that is made into a popular movie. There are film industry players and prolific screenwriters who have already taken this journey numerous times. Nevertheless, thousands of writers spend countless hours in screenwriting forums chatting about their current/past stories, popular films they like, creative ideas that excite them, and famous screenwriters they admire. They are motivated to make industry connections, form new friendships and build meaningful relationships. Hundreds of Instagram page owners post content sharing personal script projects, screenwriting contests, potential story ideas and script pages to their personal screenplays. True screenwriters hold passion for creating compelling stories. Patience and perseverance hold the key to making your screenwriting dream a lucrative career.

If we wish our screenplay will eventually be optioned, we are putting our dream on a pedestal. Making Hollywood appear unattainable is giving the film industry way too much credit for our future happiness. It is possible to write a good screenplay capable of winning screenwriting competitions.

Your script can move past gatekeepers to get optioned. Your script can be made into a Netflix movie. Your script can become a blockbuster movie. Visualize what you want and apply yourself to go get it. 

We must believe in our creative adventures. Don't worry about what people think. You are not selfish for desiring to live your dream. If you put forth the effort, you deserve to live a better life.  

Writers have many goals in sight. Looking in the rearview mirror can/will block progress. Discipline, time management and passion will keep your screenwriting dream moving forward. We must keep writing pages, research what studios want/need, listen to podcasts featuring successful screenwriters, study great screenwriters, learn about the business of movies and build our stories into profound movies. When I mention scripts, I mean we must complete several scripts to increase our chances in getting noticed. 

One script can connect us with the right people who want to view our writing portfolio. It's possible this individual, that studio or those group of people may not have interest in optioning our only script. However, our writing talents may attract the attention of industry-connected people. They may ask us what other projects we have stored in our script arsenal. Don't sell yourself short by investing your entire farm into only one script idea, unless you are confident in this story to sacrifice everything.  

This is where your patience and perseverance come into play. No matter what obstacles and challenges stand in your way, you must be confident in your creation(s). Pet projects usually create intense excitement because these stories hit close to home. These projects hold a deeper meaning-- they fulfill our inner desires. They can go back to our childhood, where we enjoyed watching science fiction movies such as E.T. and Star Wars. Emotional connections can take us down memory lane. 

The most powerful filmmakers in Hollywood had to wait their turn. Christopher Nolan directed Memento, Insomnia, Batman Begins, The Prestige and The Dark Knight to earn his chance at making Inception. The Dark Knight Rises, Interstellar, Dunkirk and Tenet followed Inception. Given Nolan's track record, he is one of most successful directors working in Hollywood.  

Good things happen to those who are patient is a flawed saying. It should be good things happen to those who work hard while being patient for opportunities. Staying confident to continue working on your script project(s) hold(s) immense power over your dreams and goals.    

Most of the time, we must prove our value before we take a stab at prized projects. For the most part, we will likely have to pay our dues working on projects with no creative value. Reality television is a perfect example of aspiring filmmakers going to film school and accepting high paying jobs working on uncreative ventures to climb up that industry ladder. Never judge professional work that rewards you with valuable experience. If you get paid to perform your talents, you are moving in the right direction.

Many writers get stuck listening to what writing books tell them to write. They follow Save The Cat, Kate Wright's sequences, A Hero With A Thousand Faces, Story and other books that instruct writers what must happen at what time with careful attention to the author's thoughts and theories. Following this approach turns a screenplay into a cliched piece of unoriginal work. Even though our scripts are fictional pieces of work, we have no obligation to mimic past screenplays. 

The human condition and emotions connect the audience with characters who may have similar traits that resemble theirs. How do people behave in a pre-apocalyptic world? What will people do to protect a secret? What fears block them? What regrets do they have? What is stopping them from talking to their true love? End of the world movies convey real actions of real life people. 

Truth is, we waste too much time living in the past instead of planning for our future. We don't do enough to live our dream. We need constant attention to feel self-worth. We focus on what other people are doing. We stay on the sidelines, being afraid of looking bad in front of people who we don't know. We postpone making decisions to avoid rejection. We obsess over small things that have no impact on the bigger picture.

We let years pass us by without responding to what we want. We allow true love to slip away. We don't take personal responsibility. We blame other peole for our mistakes. We don't show we care about our dream to be taken seriously. We need people to validate us. We envy others for living the dream we think we are better at doing but do nothing to make it happen. We are to blame for our own life. Nobody is responsible for our failures. The moment we can accept personal responsibility, there will be hope for us to achieve greatness. 

If you don’t give your dream any attention, you are guaranteed to fail what you want most in this life. 


Happy Screenwriting! 
        

Thursday, August 6, 2020

Is it Writer's Block Or Lost Passion?

Writer's block is a killer on creativity. When writers lose focus on the writing process, they defer to daily distractions as an escape mechanism. Washing dishes, searching the web, posting on social media, watching Tv, doing laundry and sleeping are a few activities that replace writing. As a result of these actions, writers question whether they lost their passion to keep writing. Writer's block and lost passion hold the power to starve creativity. There is hope to get back on track...

Writers automatically assume writer's block is to blame for stalled production, lack of effort, poor performance and low efficiency. It is not always writer's block that is holding writers back from moving forward to the next page. It is not always writer's block that is responsible for keeping a cursor flashing on a blank white screen. It is not always writer's block that delays projects from coming to fruition. What is causing writers to get frustrated?

The problem: Inhibited environments represent the source of low interest. If we are surrounded with supportive people who want us to thrive, we will maintain excitement to get work done. We can rely on these people to give us feedback. They will ask about our projects. They will understand that we need our quiet space. They will genuinely care about what we are working on. Unfortunately, most writers are not always so lucky to meet these ideal people. We can take control of our surroundings, emotions and feelings to make positive progress.

Our environment is never going to reflect the way we imagine it. There is constant noise that can distract us. People rarely stop gossiping about irrelevant matters. They have conversations out loud. They don't give us space. They need us to help them with their errands and projects. They want us to listen to their concerns. Writers deal with people sabotaging their dreams because they lack the confidence to speak up; they are pushovers with no backbone to stand tall.

Unfinished projects make us believe we lost our passion to dream. We can't get excited about what we once loved with our entire heart. We start envying people who are actually living the life we believe we deserve. We become jealous to hear that our competition achieved their dream. Meanwhile, we focus on doing too much of everything. We desire quick results instead of investing time, energy and effort into our pet projects. Our patience and perseverance are out of alignment. We keep talking about our projects to get attention. We act fake to make believe we are someone living our dream. We may act condescending to put others below us. Behind the scenes, we drag our feet and hang our heads down low to pity ourselves. Self-destructive attitudes are what block positive results.

Writer's block and lost passion are common excuses that writers use to feel better. Nobody wants to be viewed as uninspired and lazy. Lost passion is essentially allowing little things to get in the way our of big dream. Self-doubts, overthinking, excuses and distractions are defensive mechanisms that protect us from facing failure. We may fear people rejecting our talents and skills because we attach our identity to our dream. We may think that if we fail our dream, we will fail our purpose in this life.

Rewiring our brain to accept criticism is the first step to empowering positive/negative feedback to grow our writing into something beautiful, something inspiring. Hearing the truth saves us a lot of time. We may need to know what people really think. Does our story have potential? Will the audience enjoy watching this movie? What does our film resemble? Do we have a good theme? Sadly, some creative people capable of greatness expect people to always give their amateur and professional work kind compliments. In order to continue on with their passion, they need people to praise their every move. These people only share a snippet of their progress to win temporary acceptance. They treat attention and acceptance as oxygen. However, these writers remain stuck on page 5 of a 100 page script. We should not expect our work to be viewed as great: Life does not work this way.

People struggling with low confidence and low self-esteem require validation and acceptance to stay inspired and motivated. These people need other people to agree with their beliefs. They wait for others to give them 100 percent positive approval to move forward. They want people to praise their effort after sharing their pity parties. They need people to feel sorry for them. They want others to tell them what they want is guaranteed to happen. They need others to know they didn't waste their life away on impossible dreams. They depend on people to always pick them off the ground. They need people to see them, to notice them every day. The truth gets lost in the hay; it is the needle that will take forever to locate.

Athletes playing to win their coach's attention and approval will suffer after striking out, missing shots and dropping balls. Always remember that we are human beings choosing to use our gifts and talents. Win or lose, we are the same human beings. Just imagine all the possibilities, especially if we activate our laser focus to stay committed and not conflicted with what people think.

We either love our passion, or we are doing it for the wrong reasons. Seeking attention to nurse our unresolved issues is the quickest route to depression. Living for the opinions of others will lead to lifelong unhappiness. If we lose our passion, what is the reason for this happening? Did we have passion from the beginning? Are we following our dream just to be recognized as someone who is valuable? Do we lack self-worth? Do we have low self-esteem? Trying our best to pinpoint our lost passion, if this is important to us, will improve our future outlook. Time will never stop for us, so waiting for a better time is an excuse.

Our commitment as screenwriters should focus on building powerful stories into compelling movies. Take personal responsibility for your dream. If you need constant validation to live your dream, you will only focus on what other people think about your actions. Dreams don't work unless you do something to make them come true. It is as simple as starting a script and writing 100 pages. Keep revising your script until you believe the story fits your vision.

There is no right or wrong way to tell a story. Pay special attention to creativity, technique and theme to keep readers invested in your script. Write with conviction to stay on track: Follow your message and share your beliefs. An example of this approach is Jordan Peele's Get Out, a film that aims to convey racism as envying minorities for their physical strength and agility.    

Writer's block is a mental block that involves numerous components. When we sit at our computer constantly looking into space, we are dealing with a challenge much bigger than writer's block and lost passion. We may dislike our story. We may downplay our talents to get compliments. Our passion is what inspires us to take action on something that either happens now, happens later, or never happens at all. Trusting in our gifts and talents can reduce writer's block. Believing in ourselves will give us hope to continue on through the trenches.

If we complain about writer's block and losing our passion, we are accepting that we have problems that are blocking our production. Taking the easy way out to complain and whine about recurring setbacks will never get us anywhere. Sharing all the things that we do to live our dream is a bargaining chip to say people owe us. It is our job to wake up and be inspired. We must maintain our passion to keep moving forward. If we are struggling to start and/or finish projects, we must dig deeper to understand the source of this problem.

There are ways to improve our concentration. We can listen to good music during the writing process. We can enjoy our favorite drink. We can take vitamins. We can go on a walk. We can go hiking. We can purchase a nice pen. We can buy a cool notepad. We can use "focus-based" apps to switch between focus time and breaks. We can embrace distractions to make them a part of our characters. We can change our scenery. We can go to a beach and write. We can go to a motel off of the coast and write without distractions. We can schedule time to write daily. We can discipline our writing life.

Writer's block and lost passion are excuses to justify our lack of effort and low production. After years of making excuses to write scripts, I finally figured out that you must rescue yourself to overcome negative traits. We can get caught up in bad habits that restrict our personal growth. In contrast, we can transfer our bad habits, blocks and problems into our stories. Compelling characters can turn movies into emotional experiences because the audience may see a piece of their life experiences in the movie. They can embrace these personal connections, realizing the writer actually understands their life.

Writer's block and lost passion can mirror what is going on in our real lives. If we work with a co-writer who wants to control our entire story, we must re-evaluate whether to stay for the long haul or leave them behind to grow our dream elsewhere. We can outgrow mentors, teachers and coaches. These people can block us, making us think we are struggling with writer's block, low drive and lost passion.

Being on the same page requires two sides to compromise on one vision. Don't allow other people to walk all over you. They may tell you that they care about your dream and assure you that they will never do anything to harm you. However, their actions may show a darker side to their real motivation. What really matters to them is their dream What they really want is to succeed. What they need is your story. What they are doing is discarding your scenes, ideas and creativity to feed their egos. They may want to be viewed as smart, a genius and exceptionally talented. Somehow, we are letting someone push us back into the crowd.

Negative people find empowerment seeing other people experiencing pain and suffering. Step away from every person you believe is holding you back. If you miss them later on, they are important to your future. If you feel better without them, maybe they are a bad fit in your life. Sooner or later, you need to recognize that you can do what you want yourself. Never think you are not good enough. Hiding from your unresolved issues will delay your dreams. If you are not ready to embrace the spotlight, you have the freedom to step in the crowd and watch the show as an audience member.

Know the difference between writer's block, lost passion, or living a stressful life full of obstacles. Your dream will stop waiting for you to react. Nobody is to blame for your life. You control your dream. You can make or break your future. You can learn from your past to create profound movies with deeper meanings. You can stop listening to people who block your growth. You can change your scenery to restore your interest. If you care about your dream, you will make adjustments instead of resorting to excuses. May your dream come true.

Happy Screenwriting!


Wednesday, July 29, 2020

Do The Work And Stop Listening to Others

Successful screenwriters write daily, read scripts and watch movies. There is always room to learn something new. Most of the time we don't know the entire story ahead of new script projects. Therefore, we must perform research to fill in the pieces that turn our story into a completed puzzle.

Embrace the screenwriting process. Be proud that you are a storyteller. It is a gift to make worlds come to life with words. Imagining your creative ideas going from script to screen is an amazing dream.

Never complain about living a dream. Writing movies is a gift we should celebrate daily. Do the work: Don't allow others to discourage you from living your dream.

Happy Screenwriting!






Sunday, July 5, 2020

Screenwriting Music


Do you listen to music while screenwriting? I listen to EDM/Trance music? 

Saturday, June 27, 2020

Lack of Support and Understanding: Why Writers Do What They Do?

Have you ever tried to include family and friends in your writing process? Share ideas with them? Tell them how you will write your scripts? However, you are met with eye rolls, sighs, unsupportive comments and criticism. Why do you have to justify the reasons you are a writer?

Some writers may feel they need other people to support their ideas. They attempt to open up with family, friends and even random strangers to prove their stories hold value. Once people realize you what you haven't done, they will stop listening to you talking...

Truth is, these people get tired of hearing about your dreams. Writers who have have yet to discover lucrative opportunities are judged with heavy criticism. They hear rude comments... They deal with passive aggressive behavior. Unsupportive people may have ulterior motives to hold you down. If you dream, you may accomplish success. If you accomplish success, it is possible you may leave...

Another way to look at it... If writers spend as much time living real life instead of remaining stuck inside a fantasy, just maybe their dream will come true. Some writers must understand that attention is overrated. Chasing after people to validate your dream will make you unhappy.

Just try to understand this: Screenwriting is viewed as a dream. What people think: Unsuccessful screenwriters are basically living in the clouds.

Do you take jobs that give you flexibility to live your dream? Work as a restaurant server? A ridesharing driver? Delivery driver? Barista? Content creation? Data science? Falling further behind? Struggling with a financial storm? There is a reason we may follow this pattern. You may hope that extending your dream can give you another chance to make everything right.

It goes much deeper than just wanting to achieve dreams, become famous, gain social status and/or get rich to experience unlimited freedom. You have a true reason you want your dream...

Whether you want to draw attention to yourself.... Whether you want to prove people wrong... Whether you want to appear successful... Whether you need value to feel self-worth... Whether you have a purpose to change the world... Whether you aspire to make people think that helping others is why you spend so much doing it... Whether you want to be popular because you did not have this feeling growing up... Whether you want compliments to boost your self-esteem... Whether you aspire to carry out the will of God to serve this world... Only you know why you want to do it.

Rewiring the mind to reflect on your dream is important. It is what can/will remove all focus off of why you need support and people to understand your journey as a writer.

Why do people want to feel good? Why do people want to feel happy? Why do people desire love? Why do people need acceptance? Why do people live for others?

Follow your dream because you find happiness taking the steps. Be excited about doing the work because you love your creativity. Be proud of yourself. The moment you make your dream all about what you are missing inside, you will find many unhappy moments. If you transfer what you are missing into your stories, you will reach an audience who can understand why you do what you do...

Ultimately, writers create what people watch... In return, they may feel proud of their work. They can make a living creating stories. It is possible: There is this small piece of them that may need this attention. If you surround yourself with supportive people who understand your journey, you will have a strong foundation to develop your ideas. If you tell stories about your challenges, struggles and hardships, people will listen to you.

The love, the time, the effort, the energy, the passion you give your dream will give you what you need inside. When people watch what you created, they will support you because they will know you understand real life. Create stories that mirror real life and solve these inner problems: Conflict/Resolution. Writers plant themes in every story. They want to send a message out into the world. Look further into why you do what you do...

Through the course of this life, you will change your motivation many times. Instead of questioning why you lack support and why people do not understand you, look deeper into your motivation. Why do you need your dream? You will eventually realize that you are your best support system. You are enough.

Don't wait to do what you love to do later on. The people you may want to prove wrong will be long gone. If you want people to hear your voice, tell stories that matter right now. Happy screenwriting!

Tuesday, June 23, 2020

Screenwriting Techniques

Movie scripts are documents. They function as a blueprint to turn an idea into a film. Directors rely on scripts to shoot scenes that are eventually edited together and packaged into films. There are so many useful screenwriting techniques that writers can use to narrate their stories.

Some stories can benefit being told from beginning to end without any disruptions. Writers enter a conflict, show the fire starting and resolve the conflict with a simple message. But if you want to get creative, you can enhance your script to create page turners. 

Flashbacks give us backstory. The proper method of using a flashback is to build enough value into characters so that we understand the significance of their past. Writers can open with a partial scene of a narrative they want to tell. Throughout the story, they can revisit this scene to move this key moment further along. The character may reflect back to this moment in their dream, in the middle of a conversation, in a coma and/or while they are driving.

We see a glimpse of the protagonist hanging on a moment that motivates their choices. We enter their mind through these flashbacks. We watch moments that already happened to explain backstory.

Series of shots and montages can turn dull moments into spectacular events. Have fun being creative in your storytelling!!!   

Tuesday, August 6, 2019

Suggestions Not Judging: Creating compelling characters

Screenwriting is a creative art that requires criticism to make progress. In order to become a professional screenwriter, we should accept constructive criticism as helpful feedback that can give us solid ideas.

Getting stuck in our comfortable ways to protect our ego can/will hold us back. There are vulnerable writers who view suggestions as judging their character.

Judging is unfairly criticizing someone without having all the facts present. A woman with tattoo sleeves is viewed as a stripper. "You are weak for allowing everyone to take advantage of you," is a negative statement. "You are terrible with your finances," is making a poor judgement of someone who does not earn as much at their current job. "Your finances will be the reason we will not get funding," is another inconsiderate judgemental statement if someone is not the sole reason for this potentially happening. 

What is not considered judging is telling someone that if they did not allow a certain person they complain about often to interfere in their life, they would not have to go back to a bad situation. We can tell them that if they gave more effort, they would have already accomplished their dream. The trigger word that sparked this person: Effort. They believe they have given a lot of effort. Truth is, they lost their passion to create. They allowed stress and pressure to rule their life. For this reason, they would constantly reach out for help. Unfortunately, they never applied valuable advice to better their life.  

Some people just need attention. They thrive off of sympathy. They need to be heard. They rely on another ear that will listen to their problems. They want us to blame other people. We're not supposed to solve other people's problems. Unresolved issues can block these people from taking actions. 

Whatever unresolved issues these people are dealing with come to the surface. They immediately get offended, switching the spotlight back to you—deflecting. They will attack your lack of effort. They will tell you to give up on your dream. Instead of appreciating your advice, they will consider your advice as judging. 

Unresolved issues can spark low confidence, insecurities, shame, lack of success, low self-worth, depression, unhappiness, vulnerabilities, self-consciousness and inferiority. It is a multi-headed monster that can unleash fury on us without notice. 

We must think of positive words to not offend them. We must compliment them to stroke their fragile ego. We must give them false praise to boost their moods. 

Just think about the value of life experiences. Our interactions with people who struggle with a wide range of challenges are useful to expand our screenwriting. No moment in life can ever go wasted. We can use everything in our past to create compelling characters. 

People fear getting judged because they secretly know they are doing these negative things. If they already shared their indiscretions before, it is not judging to bring these topics up again during their "complaining and whining' storms. Being honest to help pinpoint the source of problems can empower people. Overly sensitive people who feel guilty inside feel judged.    

Confident people don't worry about judgmental people. They don't focus on what people think and say. They concentrate on urgent priorities that can/will improve their current situation. Schedules and deadlines replace overthinking to maximize time. 

Good screenwriting is recycling real life events to build characters. We meet certain people for a reason;  there are no accidents. Taking notes to save the past can work magic in our future scripts. 

Many people feel judged. Many people never seek counseling. Many people get triggered over internal pain. We can't control what happens outside of our lives. People have a right to act any way they want. It is not up to us how they live their lives. If they waste our time and energy returning back with the same problems they refuse to confront, re-evaluate your relationship with them. 

When people accuse you of judging them, they hold your opinion on a pedestal. If you mention being disappointed, they will take this to heart. Be careful what you say to vulnerable people. Recycle all past experiences to infuse your script with valuable content to teach people. 

What are we about? What is our message? How can we save people from making costly mistakes? Make your screenwriting a learning experience to spread true wisdom. 

Happy Screenwriting! 
    

Friday, July 19, 2019

The End. Closure in Your Script

The end of anything good is never fun. Reaching the end of something bad can give us great relief. Sometimes we are not ready to leave our past just yet. We need extra time to heal our hearts and minds: Closure. If you are a screenwriter, “The End” represents a powerful moment to celebrate.

“The End” of many ends... Draft after draft... Sleepless nights.... Many creative thoughts... Lack of support... Criticism... Eventually, there is an end to your screenplay. Screenwriters ponder on that last moment to finish their screenplays. The ending is so important because it can leave an everlasting impression on viewers.

How will you end your masterpiece? What is a good movie ending? Cliffhanger? Happy ending? Sad ending? Bittersweet ending? Redemption ending? The ending is the resolution that ties your story together.

The Third Act should be impactful. Reward the audience. Make “The End” count. The Green Mile has a tearjerking ending. We remember emotional movies that touch our souls.

Spend extra time on the ending. Think of clever ways to close your script. However you choose to end your screenplay, just know “The End” can make or break your story.

The End.

Happy Screenwriting! 

Thursday, July 18, 2019

I went to these top Film Schools, so I matter more?

Some film school graduates enjoy reliving their glory days. They believe their film degrees earned at prestigious universities give them the right to put people down. Meanwhile, these so-called filmmakers keep reminding people of their brilliance. They never stop short of insulting people just for the fact that they can. Superiority is a cancer. This condescending behavior is unacceptable.

If you experience negative encounters with film school graduates who have yet to accomplish success, just move past these miserable human beings. Truth is, miserable people are energy vampires. They need your attention, your focus, your life-force to exist. Without your good energy, they lose their power to create conflict. 

As aspiring filmmakers, do not accept negativity in your daily life. You have a choice to live life the way you see fit. Other people can hold you back. They can block your dream. Beware of people who want to ride your wave to success.

I rarely mention that I attended film school. I listen to all people. I never make myself out to be bigger. 

Some people will make you believe that they are the only support you have in your life. They assume. They control. They can acknowledge you one minute, but will break you down the next minute.   

Protect your dream. Remove people who give you daily pressure and stress. Once these people are gone, you will restore your freedom. Believe in yourself. 

Happy screenwriting! 



Humility is A Dying Breed: Social Media Is Ruining Screenwriting

Only a Film Degree--We must work to be screenwriters
We all know humble. We all know braggers. We all know action. We all know inaction...

Social media has casted a negative light on the writing world. On social media platforms, more people talk about the act of writing instead of waking every day to be proactive go-getters. In hindsight, writers once got work done; they completed scripts to option. Unfortunately, social media has turned screenwriting into a dream that is viewed as unreachable.

Screenwriting is an art form. It is also a discipline that requires time, energy and effort. Truth is, finished scripts are appealing to producers. There is little demand for unfinished scripts because they can't be produced. What separates professional screenwriters from aspiring screenwriters: Discipline.

Think about these comparisons: I am working on my degree versus I earned my degree. Any person can be working on a degree; however, only a select few will actually satisfy all the requirements to complete their degree programs.

Screenwriting is made out to be difficult. The real truth is that anything in life can be difficult if we fear the next step. We can make waking up on time to reach work a major challenge. We can make exercising daily an insurmountable task. We can postpone talking to someone we like over the lack of confidence. Placing constraints on our screenwriting will create fear. A large number of people worry about criticism. They automatically assume that receiving criticism is a precursor to failure. Their dream is better shared in forums, on discussion boards, on social media and in real life conversations.

Braggers need to draw attention to themselves. They need this attention to feel worth. The problem with sharing our dreams without doing the work is that we can block access to production. We spend way too much time trying to impress people with our creative ideas. We may post images about what we are supposedly doing, even if we are not actually working hard perfecting our craft. We will ask other writers/people what they think about our ideas so they can praise us. Condescending, bitter and petty attitudes can rule our emotions. We need to prove people wrong all the time. We fake being successful to create that adrenaline rush, that pure excitement of what it's like to accomplish a dream. Nevertheless, we can get carried away with all the attention that our dreams bring us.

Humble writers make movie magic happen. They wake up motivated and inspired to write. They write at their most vulnerable moments. They revise their previous projects. They don't crave attention. They already know their value as human beings choosing to be writers. There is no internal motivation to trick people, unless these themes are injected into characters.

Know the difference between being humble and bragging. If you are working hard, you earned the right to talk about your success. On the flip side, talking about the dream and not taking action to make it happen will delay the inevitable. Don't waste time. Your screenwriting dream will only come true if you do.

Happy screenwriting!


   

Wednesday, July 17, 2019

Write Descriptive Visuals



What do you see? What will the viewer see? Write descriptive visuals that covey actions without dialogue.

Practice writing less to show more. Cinema is meant to explore visual storytelling. Get into the habit to set the mood in every new setting.

If you follow this approach, your screenwriting will lift off the pages.

Happy screenwriting! 

Thursday, July 11, 2019

Write What You Already Know

It is no secret that writing about what you know will increase your excitement to create. Many people assume they have a story to tell, so they try to become that person who will convince writers their lives can make a fortune. When writers ask them to help with the writing process, they say they don't have time. What these people really want is to ride the wave of success without doing any work. Write what you know, not what others want you to do.

We don't have any time to waste. 

Reflect back to all the moments you could have completed screenplays. I'm sure there are many lost opportunities. The past is a common psychological tool that prevents us from living life with peace and happiness. Talking about screenwriting as if we are already working writers in Hollywood will make us appear as faking it until we make it. Don't be one of these people in real life. Writing about someone who is fake in public to protect their true identity in their private life is a good story. Sharing your personal experiences with these fake people, which I have had many in my past, will bring life to your screenwriting to create a compelling screenplay.

Just imagine every situation your dream has created in your life.

Write about the life you lived over the dream you want. Without your dream, you would be living a different life. Maybe this normal life will give you a less stressful lifestyle. However, you would never know what it's like to accomplish a dream. The trap of viewing success as easy instead of understanding the hardship it takes is something to consider in your future scripts.

What events happened along the way? Did you laugh? Get sad? Get angry? Did you lose love? There are so many events in your life that can make good storytelling. We don't have to write these events as is. We all know that true life stories are modified for creative impact.

Get creative with your life stories.

We don't have to write our screenplays as real life experiences. We should use our life as inspiration to create fictional character who maneuver through our life. Teach people important lessons that you learned about your life.

Instead of looking at negative outcomes, focus on what you learned to grow into a better human being.

Tell people about your life. What are you about? Who are you as a screenwriter? What type of stories do you like to tell? What is your message to the world? Write these stories. Share your creative energy. If you learn something new about yourself after writing a script, you did your job perfectly right. Make screenwriting a transformation process. Writing what you already know will light a flame that can help your creativity burn brighter.

Please share your screenwriting experiences in the comment section below. 

Happy screenwriting!

Tuesday, April 9, 2019

Focus on yourself to grow your screenwriting career

Screenwriting is all about you. You represent the one person who can make a screenplay really good. 

Focus on yourself. Grow as a writer. Find your writing voice. Notice your value. Don't be desperate. Don't chase unless this is happening in your script. 

Be confident to write and pitch. Know your characters, plot and theme. Compare your script to past projects.

If we focus on all aspects of filmmaking, we will be better equipped to navigate through the film industry. Focusing on helping others to get what you want can take away valuable time from your dream. 

Guiding people to find success is a good thing; however, there are some people with immoral intentions to take advantage. When their dream becomes more important than yours, you will delay your success. 

Don't lose time and energy on the wrong people. Protect your dream. Nobody will love your dream as much as you love it.  

Prepare yourself to be more than just a screenwriter. Screenwriters should think like producers. 

Remember to write the raw pages to flush out your creativity. 






Thursday, February 4, 2016

An Article on How Creed Movie Lessons Can Teach Screenwriters

Ryan Coogler's Creed hit movie theaters on Thanksgiving Day. Michael B. Jordan teamed up with director Ryan Coogler a second time, the first pairing in Fruitvale Station.

In this Rocky spinoff, Rocky Balboa (Sylvester Stallone) is now retired from boxing. He owns a restaurant inspired by his boxing career. Michael B. Jordan's Adonis Creed moved to Philly, walked into Rocky's restaurant and introduced himself as Apollo Creed's son.

According to ScreenCraft, Creed teaches us valuable lessons that screenwriters can use to master their screenwriting craft. Check out the following article on Creed and screenwriting here.






Thursday, November 20, 2014

Original Scripts are going to make a return

Original Scripts

Original scripts reached their height in the 80's. However, originality has taken a backseat to comic book movies. Batman, The Avengers, Spiderman, Hulk, Iron Man, Superman, X-Men, and other superhero movies are generating billions of dollars in the worldwide box office. Artistic expression, as we see in Interstellar, is impossible without the credentials to back up such a large budget.

In Hollywood, writers must pay their dues to get a movie made. Writing a movie that appeals to a mass audience will win future projects. Would a great writer sacrifice creativity for longevity? Breaking into Hollywood requires a screenwriter to sell a spec script, write uncredited scenes, and/or hold writing experience in the television space.

There are several other strategies to get into Hollywood, such as winning screenwriting contests, film festivals, writing fellowships, writing programs, industry connections, and old-fashioned luck.

Why are comic book movies dominating the movie box office? One screenwriter, who is on the verge of selling his show, shared that comic book movies already have a built-in audience. It doesn't take much endless marketing to convince fans to watch these types of movies. Young children and adolescents, even adults, enjoy watching comic book movies.

Nonetheless, Hollywood is not ready to accept original movies quite yet. Soon enough, there will be a renaissance, a new movement, a resurgence where demand for original movies will outweigh remakes, reboots, comic books, books, sequels, and other movie types. For the most part, original movies take more effort to build a new market.

It seems movie studios are reluctant to gamble on new screenwriters and original screenplays. Past original movies nearly bankrupted studios, also resulting in executives getting pink slips for these lackluster duds.

Get ready for renewed demand in original scripts. In a few short years, Hollywood may be calling out for your original screenplays. Your hard work and dedication will pay off soon enough. Stay patient and never lose sight of the screenwriting dream. Originality is on the verge of making a comeback.

Keep writing original movies. 

Saturday, August 30, 2014

Be Selfish with Your Time

Screenwriters must value their time to write great scripts. Time is of the essence. Don't allow any person to influence your time and block you from accomplishing success as a screenwriter.

Screenwriting is not an easy craft to master. It's not because a writer is not talented enough, is because you must protect yourself from family, friends, co-workers and strangers that use negativity as empowerment to disrupt you. They believe success is based on immediate results, so writing is viewed as a struggling art that lacks substance and profitability. Their first impression of you is that you're dreaming and can't compete against what they believe are highly talented professionals.

Little do these people know that your writing can earn you a good living. People are quick to judge. If you don't drive a fancy car and own a home, you are considered a failure.

Education doesn't matter to these people. Some people have said that college degrees make good toilet paper. It is the mere fact that if you're not earning money and hold a quality education, then this is frowned upon. People form an image of you as being unreliable to search for realistic jobs. They see you as dreamer who doesn't want to wake up to reality.

What if you have already developed a writing portfolio? You've probably written quality projects. While these writing samples are out there, making a name for oneself can actually be compromised. Writers must survive, which is the reason they take money rather than credit. In result, the writer is prevented from showcasing all their past writing work and this may impact their job hunt.

Family, friends, co-workers and strangers can become antagonists that make you feel insecure about your screenwriting goals. These people may represent conflict, obstacles and challenges which resemble structured scenes in screenplays.

Be selfish with your time and don't give your time away so easily. Never let this negativity, this jealousy block your success. Your dream is about your happiness. Think of all the people in the world that can benefit from your stories. Thus, your dream makes many people smile. It makes them ambiguous. It inspires and motivates them to dream like you and everyone else.

You wasting time trying to please others may hurt your chances. It really depends on the attitudes that surround you. If people look down at you, then you are fighting an impossible battle. Screenwriters need to survive in the moment until their scripts are optioned and/or if another writing project arrives that keeps the income streaming in.

For most screenwriters, consistency is never a dependable theme. It's sad to say that money and lack of support kill screenwriting dreams. Those screenwriters who can overcome these major challenges will reach the top. It is true that the odds are against you. They really are. Not for the reason you think with lacking talent, instead this setback is lacking support.

Protect your dream. Utilize time management to treat your screenwriting dream like a job. If you're not a working screenwriter, your screenwriting is primarily your future job and career. Schedule time to write. Don't let people deter you because they will instill fear and doubt in your mind. If you allow this to happen, you don't really want to become a successful screenwriter.

Be selfish with your time. Treat your screenwriting like a job. People don't usually bother others that go to work. They may bother you because they think you're just a writer and nothing is happening in your life. Don't believe this. Everything is happening.

Tell them you have to work. You have projects to complete. In time, your dream of becoming a screenwriter will gain traction and people will watch your work unfold. Just believe in yourself and never falter on fears. Screenwriting is your journey to teach people about real life, real struggles and real dreams.

We are capable of reaching dreams. Our passion and desire rely on time. We have a certain amount of time allotted to this dream before we must move on. Just like movies, we can keep the audience in the movie theater forever. Your time matters most, so don't waste it on people who want to sabotage your dreams, your success, your happiness.

***A good movie to watch about a real-life character experiencing unfortunate events and reaching a dream is The Pursuit of Happyness. Perseverance and persistence are the foundation to prosperity.   

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Write What you know

***Spoiler Alert***

***The Duplex***


I watched The Duplex movie last week. This is a good movie for aspiring authors and screenwriters to watch. Because Ben Stiller's character is an author, we see his conflicted life draw out on the silver screen. These events are especially valuable to writers, the type of authors and screenwriters who sought after writing books and movies about real stories.

"Write what you know" is what the antagonist shares in the movie ending. The old antagonist made the protagonists suffer beyond belief, which she has done to many couples to drive them crazy. Once the couples had enough, they sold their homes for cheap and left. It was a recurring theme to make money off these poor couples. 

As passionate writers, we realize the best material is made out of true events. Nonetheless, true events are always in high demand. Moviegoers crave watching movies based on true stories because they feel a connection with these characters. 

Horror movies based on true stories such as The Conjuring, The Rite, and The Possession involve evil themes which depict reality. Devil and demon themes are the epitome of evil. These unsettling topics make their way to our minds, provoking our subconscious to fear any notion of their influence. 

Write what you know. Inject your stories with real life. While you may experience unfortunate situations, these events become memorable stories that people want to watch at the movies and read in books. 

Write away! 



Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Inject screenplays with real life

How many times have you heard that Hollywood is losing their grip on making movies? If you write movie scripts, then you know good writing goes a long way. Writing compelling screenplays based on real-life scenarios will capture a large fan base. This is your time to shine. Inject screenplays with your life experiences.

Original movies are in high demand. In the past three decades, original movies have quickly declined. Hollywood is viewed as a recycling platform focused on making movies that earn massive revenue. As a result of this, remakes, comic book movies, reboots, and books are leading the film circuit. Original movies are almost nonexistent.

Screenwriters should use their life experiences to shape movie characters. Movie characters thrive on conflict because the central theme depends on introducing tense situations and events.

Great writers know how to shape their characters. If you want to become successful in Hollywood, write original screenplays using your real life experiences. Good luck!